O’Keeffe and Friends

Okeeffe jack in pulpit series_IV and VI

(left) Georgia O’Keeffe, Jack-in-the-Pulpit No. IV, 1930. Oil on canvas, 40 x 30 in. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Alfred Stieglitz Collection, bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe 1987.58.3 (right) Georgia O’Keeffe, Jack-in-the-Pulpit No. VI, 1930. Oil on canvas, 36 x 18 in. The National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC. Alfred Stieglitz Collection, bequest of Georgia O’Keeffe 1987.58.5

While the National Gallery of Art‘s East Building galleries are closed for renovation, the Phillips is the (ecstatic!) temporary home to two works from Georgia O’Keeffe‘s Jack-in-the-Pulpit series. The series, a total of six canvases, was inspired by O’Keeffe’s close observations of the wildflower in the woods surrounding photographer Alfred Stieglitz’s family home in Lake George, New York. Looking at the images above without this information, what would you have thought these were paintings of? Now imagine encountering just the one on the right, Jack-in-the-Pulpit No. VI. Would you have guessed it was inspired by flora?

The loaned paintings will be on display starting this Thursday alongside other works by O’Keeffe from the Phillips’s own collection, as well as pieces from other members of the Stieglitz Circle including Arthur Dove, John Marin, Marsden Hartley, and Alvin Langdon Coburn.

American Acrostics: Ernest Fiene

Ernest Fiene, Fall of Old Houses, not dated. Oil on canvas, 26 1/4 x 36 1/4 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1930.

To celebrate the last month of Made in the USA, we’ve asked Phillips staff to create acrostic poems for works in the exhibition. In this post, Phillips Director Dorothy Kosinski highlights what she finds unusual about this cityscape scene.

 

Ernest Fiene, Fall of Old Houses
Urban scene…in pinks and blues??
Speeding Elevated trains
Assemblage of old and new / constant change

Dorothy Kosinski, Director

Bibs, Dogs, Hip Hop, and Hair: Miss Amelia’s Thoughts

Over the course of the exhibition, we’ve been highlighting some of our favorite submissions to our Made in the USA in-gallery comment station. The station asks visitors to respond to Thomas Eakins‘s Miss Amelia Van Buren by answering the question, “What is Amelia Thinking?”. Below are this month’s installment of giggle-worthy submissions.

Amelia Van Buren talkback_music