Coming Home From Korea

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Masterworks from The Phillips Collection being packed up and shipped back home

After a visit to the Daejeon Museum of Art in central Korea, masterworks by the likes of Daumier, Degas, Kandinsky, Picasso, and more from The Phillips Collection are headed back to the U.S. Phillips Preparator Shelly Wischhusen and Associate Registrar for Exhibitions Trish Waters snapped some pictures as the exhibition was being packed up (and got in some sightseeing as well!).

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Phillips Staff outside the Seoul Arts Center.

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(left) A quote from Duncan Phillips on the walls of the Korean exhibition (right) Associate Registrar for Exhibitions Trish Waters and Vice President of EduChosun Jung Tae Choi pose with cutouts from Manet’s Spanish Ballet

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More crates are brought in for packing up artwork.

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Phillips employees took some time to sight-see, including Olafur Eliasson’s installation at Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art in Seoul.

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View of the Dongdaemun Design Plaza.

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Phillips Preparator Bill Koberg and Associate Registrar for Exhibitions Trish Waters pose in front of a Buddhist Hanging Scroll for Outdoor Rituals (Joseon, 1700, 995X915cm, Treasure No. 1268, owned by Naesosa Temple) at the National Museum of Korea.

Highlights from Museum Week 2015

Last week, the world celebrated #MuseumWeek 2015 on Twitter. From March 23–29, museums and visitors alike shared photos and thoughts on a different theme each day. Here’s a selection of some of our favorite tweets throughout the week. Thank you to everyone who participated; see you at #MuseumWeek 2016!

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From Twitter follower ‏@ewpierce: “Spring break #SouvenirsMW @PhillipsMuseum from 2011. It was a scream of a trip!”

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From Twitter follower ‏@haionlife: “In honor of #MuseumWeek, here is what I’m inspired by & why I study art hist @ngadc @PhillipsMuseum @Tate @hirshhorn”

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From Twitter follower ‏@bluelikechagall: “Wolfgang Laib’s Wax room installation @PhillipsMuseum! #favMW Wall detail”

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From Twitter follower @LetsGoToMuseums: “Alice shows students how to make a print after a lesson on abstraction & Man Ray. @PhillipsMuseum #MuseumWeek”

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From Twitter follower ‏@aiax2: “#arquitectureMW Looking up @PhillipsMuseum #MuseumWeek”

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From Twitter follower @SenorPeanut: “One of my favorite places for reflection (and posing) #poseMW #MuseumWeek”

 

Women’s History Month: “Marjorie Sketches”

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Marjorie Phillips, Little Bouquet, 1934. Oil on canvas, 15 1/2 x 14 1/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired c. 1941

As Women’s History Month comes to a close, it’s the perfect time to reflect on some of the powerful in the art world throughout history. Often overlooked is one such woman, Marjorie Phillips, who served many roles throughout her marriage to Duncan Phillips: wife, mother, hostess, adviser, museum director, and even artist. Despite the lack of support women received for practicing art at the time that Marjorie began painting, she maintained the hobby until the end of her life. Describing how those around her reacted to her pastime, she remembers Duncan’s mother saying “‘Marjorie sketches.’ That sounded better to her than ‘Marjorie is a painter.’”

But Marjorie was a painter, and a prolific one at that. Throughout the second half of the 20th century, her paintings were exhibited in museums all over the country. Perhaps one of the most widely exhibited is Little Bouquet (1934), featuring a couple of Marjorie’s favorite things: flowers and paint. As her son Laughlin described her artistic style in 1985, “her painting always reflected a conscious decision,” an ironic statement given the apparent spontaneity in Marjorie’s subject matter. Like Little Bouquet, all of her paintings offer a glimpse into her personal life. This piece serves as an inside look at the artist’s working surface as if left mid-session. Yet each individual application of color is extremely deliberate upon close inspection. In a review of her works exhibited at the Corcoran Gallery of Art in 1955, a reporter wrote “without trying for the iridescent chromatic effects of the French painters, she gives an equal impression of color through the simplest of means.” Simple indeed, yet extremely poignant.

Marjorie’s works are exhibited throughout the collection among leading impressionists like Cézanne, Bonnard, and Monet. Her impressionist style shines among them, making her truly a leading lady among her contemporaries.

Annie Dolan, Marketing and Communications Intern