May #Phillips95 Challenge: Architects of Design

Mondrian No 9_architecture_side by side

(left) Piet Mondrian Painting No. 9, between 1939 and 1942. Oil on canvas, 31 3/8 x 29 1/4 in. Gift from the estate of Katherine S. Dreier, 1953. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC (right) Photo: Emily Conforto

We’re celebrating our 95th anniversary with a year of monthly challenges and giveaways! This month’s challenge takes inspiration from Piet Mondrian’s Painting No. 9, at left above. The ample white areas can be read as either flat surface or limitless space, and the colors, placed near the edge, draw the eye away from the center. As a result, the image hovers, as though weightless, in timeless silence or suspended energy. Mondrian believed that colors expressed spiritual light as well as emotion.

YOUR CHALLENGE: Explore your city’s architecture with Mondrian’s concepts in mind. Take a photo of your favorite building and share with #Phillips95 for a chance to win two tickets (+ two free drinks!) to Phillips after 5 on June 2. We’ll announce winners May 25.

Finding a Match in Gjon Mili

Pousttchi with Gjon Mili Ford Car

Intersections artist Bettina Pousttchi (right) with Phillips Collections Care Manager Laura Tighe (left)

Bettina Pousttchi stopped by earlier this month to consider works from the museum’s permanent collection to display with her own in her upcoming Intersections installation opening in June. Five of Pousttchi’s Double Monuments will be on view with a selection of the Phillips’s photographs, including the above image by Gjon Mili, Ford Car Being Driven through Deep Water at Ford Test Site, Detroit, MI (ca. 1948).

Kokoschka in Pencil and Paint

Kokoschka Lotte with former MA sketch

(left) Sketch of Kokoschka’s Portrait of Lotte Franzos by Twitter follower @f0rTyLeGz (right) Oskar Kokoschka, Portrait of Lotte Franzos, 1909. Oil on canvas, 45 1/4 x 31 1/4 in. Acquired 1941. The Phillips Collection, Washington DC © 2015 Foundation Oskar Kokoschka / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ProLitteris, Zürich.

A former Phillips employee shared this sketch of Oskar Kokoschka’s Portrait of Lotte Franzos (1909) from his time at the museum during the 1960’s. Do you sketch in the galleries? We’d love to see your work!