Porchia Moore Phillips Conversation

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Porchia Moore leads a discussion in the “People on the Move: Beauty and Struggle in Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series” galleries. All photos: Laura Hoffman

How do works in special exhibitions People on the Move: Beauty and Struggle in Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series and Whitfield Lovell: The Kin Series and Related Works relate to current issues of racial injustice and discrimination? Porchia Moore visited the Phillips in November to tackle this question with Phillips visitors. See below for photos and a live-tweet of the conversation.

This was the second in a series of three open conversations that use The Migration Series as a jumping off point for discussions about current issues; join us for the third installment this Thursday with the DC Jazz Festival’s Sunny Sumter, who will be facilitating a discussion focuses on themes of identity, community, and what it means to be an American. See the storify of last month’s talk below. Follow along or join the conversation with #PhillipsConversation.

 

In the Conservation Studio with William Christenberry

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Collections Care Manager Laura Tighe in the Phillips’s conservation studio

We were saddened to hear of the passing of beloved Phillips trustee emeritus and distinguished artist William Christenberry earlier this week. His work continues to resonate and impact in our galleries and beyond. Here, Collections Care Manager Laura Tighe is matting and preparing a microclimate frame for two color photographs by the artist. The works (“Bread of Life,” near Tuscaloosa, Alabama, 1989/printed 1995 above at left; “Church across Early Cotton (Vertical View),” Pickinsville, Alabama, 1964/printed 2000 below and to right) will be part of an upcoming solo exhibition in December 2016 at Maryland Institute College of Art.

Cleansing the Ills of the Past

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Whitfield Lovell, Restoreth, 2001. Charcoal on wood and found objects. Courtesy DC Moore Gallery © Whitfield Lovell and DC Moore Gallery, New York

This tableaux was originally created as part ofWhitfield Lovell’s installation Visitation, which explored the history of the Jackson Ward historic district in Richmond, Virginia, the first black entrepreneurial community in the United States, commonly described as the Harlem of the South.

Restoreth, as the artist once explained, “evolved . . . out of a need for reconciliation. For me, it bridges the abyss between slavery and the height of Jackson Ward’s heyday. The image is from a tintype of an older black woman. The work includes 33 medicine bottles—pills, powders, ointments, and tonics—that represent the elements of healing and fortification. The juxtaposition of these objects with the image of this powerful woman suggests a kind of protection from, and cleansing of, the ills of the past, while also alluding to Hoodoo practices that came from African customs.”

Whitfield Lovell: The Kin Series and Related Works is on view through Jan. 8, 2017.