Intern Spotlight: Kabrea Hayman

In this series, we profile our interns. Phillips interns are an integral part of the museum and work that we do in several different departments: curatorial, education, music, communications and marketing, and more. Our incredible interns also help with our Sunday Concerts, Phillips after 5, and other special events. This semester welcomed our first group of paid interns, part of our institutional values and commitment to diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion.

Kabrea Hayman

Kabrea Hayman

 

Which department are you interning for? Marketing and Communications.

What is your internship project? Press kits, marketing outreach, social media, and editorial/publications. This includes working on various tasks for The Phillips Collection’s press releases, mailing lists, pitch lists, social media content calendars, exhibition publications, and researching/archiving The Phillips Collection’s media features.

What do you do when you’re not at The Phillips Collection? When I am not at The Phillips, I fill my time up with my second job, doing graphic design for Brentwood Arts Exchange and many other side art projects—including Soul Series, a webshow about local DMV artists/creatives. I created the series last year, but I still am developing it and I occasionally have different photography gigs. In the recent future, I desire and plan to start writing more about art and culture through a blog but still aligned with my webshow, Soul Series.

What is your favorite space/painting here? I am an admirer of a lot of pieces in The Phillips Collection, but one of my favorite pieces would be Sunday by Edward Hopper. I wrote a research paper on this particular painting so when I saw it in person, my appreciation for the paining naturally went up.

If you were to describe The Phillips Collection in one word, what would that word be? I think Duncan Phillips described it best—”experimental”.

What is a fun fact about you? I am usual the free-spirited and open-minded one out of the bunch. I grew up in a very rural part of Maryland, that you probably never heard of until now, named Trappe. I believe the location of my upbringing allowed me to really stay in touch with myself and helped me to develop an understanding behind multiple point-of-views about life and other various subjects.

Why did you want to intern at a museum? Last year, I was lucky enough to explore The Phillips Collection, behind-the-scenes, through The University of Maryland’s Intern-For-A-Day Program so when I learned of the opportunity to intern here, I jumped on it. The Phillips Collection represents the type of institution and environment that I am aiming to continue to work for: an arts museum that not only collects and presents modern art in conversation with more traditional or historical art, but one that serves its staff, community and youth with growth opportunities and professional development. During my internship for a day, I got the chance to check out the George Condo installation and immediately knew if his artwork was showing here, that this was probably a place that I would feel very comfortable in– one that does not judge but rather examine and pushes for examination.

Anything else you’d like to share? I’m bringing back Soul Series, after a brief hiatus, and turning it into a podcast. I am super happy to announce that the new series will be sponsored by Steadfast Supply so please stay on the lookout for new artists, interviews and unique artistry. I am always researching local artists to interview as well so if you would like to be on the podcast or know of anyone that could benefit, please get in contact with me through email: breasoul@gmail.com.

Intern Spotlight: Kathryn Heine

In this series, we profile our interns. Phillips interns are an integral part of the museum and work that we do in several different departments: curatorial, education, music, communications and marketing, and more. Our incredible interns also help with our Sunday Concerts, Phillips after 5, and other special events. This semester welcomed our first group of paid interns, part of our institutional values and commitment to diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion. 

Kathryn Heine, photographed by Kabrea Hayman in front of Alma Thomas' "Breeze Rustling Through Fall Flowers", 1968, 57 7/8 x 50 in.; Acrylic on canvas; The Phillips Collection; Gift of Franz Bader, 1976

Kathryn Heine, photographed by Kabrea Hayman in front of Alma Thomas, Breeze Rustling Through Fall Flowers, 1968, Acrylic on canvas, 57 7/8 x 50 in., The Phillips Collection, Gift of Franz Bader, 1976

Which department are you interning for? Library and Archives.

What is your internship project? I am working to complete or creating Exhibition History accounts on all The Phillips Collection’s shows by combing through primary sources for the first exhibitions in the early 1920s and making physical folders for the more recent exhibitions. This includes tracking down fact sheets, checklists, wall and text tables, education materials, press kits, press clippings, audio transcripts, and installation photographs.

What do you do when you’re not at the Phillips? I am getting my masters in Art History at American University, with a focus on European Modern Art. My particular interest is in German Expressionism and I have been working on researching Gabriele Münter and Marianne von Werefkin, two talented artists that have not been appreciated nearly enough! I am currently applying for travel grants and am hoping to travel to Germany this summer to further this research for my thesis. I am slated to graduate spring 2020. I am also a volunteer Gallery Guide at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

What is your favorite space/painting here? Alma Thomas’s Breeze Rustling Through Fall Flowers. I could stare at this painting all day, the colors, the form, the movement all conjure up emotions of joy and although brightly colored, feelings of serenity. Such a beautiful work by such a talented woman.

If you were to describe the Phillips in one word, what would that word be? Friendly.

What is a fun fact about you? In my spare time, you can find me in a darkroom. I love shooting on 35mm film and printing in the darkroom at Capitol Hill Arts Workshop.

Why did you want to intern at a museum? I have interned at a couple of museums in the past, but have always been drawn to the Phillips and its collection. I also love visiting art museum libraries, and the Phillips has a special one! Making the museum (and its library) more accessible to the general public is a shared interest that I have with this museum.

Anything else you’d like to share? I’m constantly trying to debunk Linda Nochlin’s famous essay, “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?”

Progression: Stephen Wiltshire

Stephen Wiltshire is an artist who draws and paints detailed cityscapes. He has a particular talent for drawing lifelike, accurate representations of cities, sometimes after having only observed them briefly. From November 6-11, The Phillips Collection, in partnership with the Embassy of the State of Qatar in Washington, DC, welcomed him into our galleries to draw a detailed cityscape of Doha, Qatar, entirely from photographic memory. Over the course of that week, Wiltshire dazzled guests as he detailed a to-scale drawing before their eyes. Take a look at how his work progressed.

Stephen Wiltshire's canvas, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire's canvas, photographed by Victor Pierre

Stephen Wiltshire's canvas, photographed by Victor Pierre

Doha, Qatar Cityscape drawn from memory by Stephen Wiltshire, photographed by Victor Pierre

Doha, Qatar, Cityscape drawn from memory by Stephen Wiltshire. Photos: Victor Pierre