Making a Mural, Starting with a Pool

Of his artistic process, mural artist James Bullough says, “Every wall is a slightly different process…I normally start with the dark areas and work toward the light areas and just kind of move like a printer from one section of the painting all the way down.” Read more about the mural, and parts one and two of a larger interview with Bullough.

ArtGrams: Balancing Elements


Barbara Liotta’s Crenae, as photographed by Instagrammer @paulinaaalcocer

It’s the final week to see Intersections@5: Contemporary Art Projects at the Phillips. This month’s ArtGrams features some of our favorite creative visitor photos of one of the most popular works in the exhibition, Barbara Liotta’s Crenae.


Photo by Instagrammer @polozova_n


Via Instagrammer @gennainblue: “Great contemporary art saw many favorites and made me rethink my greens in my own paintings.”


Via Instagrammer @stbutts: “Sunday zen.”


Via Instagrammer @theclarelife: “Once or twice a week I drop everything to go to the woods or an art museum. A personal development day. It’s a time to wander the world without agenda and immerse my senses. I leave with fresh eyes and ears. How do you guys drop into yourselves in new ways?”


Via Instagrammer @admiring_art


Spotlight on Intersections@5: Xavier Veilhan

The Phillips celebrates the fifth anniversary of its Intersections contemporary art series with Intersections@5, an exhibition comprising work by 20 of the participating artists. In this blog series, each artist writes about his or her work on view.

Veilhan_Sitting Nude

Xavier Veilhan, Sitting Nude, 2000. Jet print mounted on aluminum, 63 x 47 1/4 in. Gift of the artist, 2013

Sitting Nude is a self-portrait in a somewhat melancholic, dark lighting. The pose recalls a classical archetypal representation of the sitting nude, like Rodin’s The Thinker. It is part of a series of portraits of individuals and couples. Some are dancing, others are fighting. Some are just resting and contemplating, like this piece. It is something I have continued to explore with other nudes, like the ones presented in my show Music at Galerie Perrotin in Paris (March 2015). More than anything else, the focus lies on the silhouette. I believe that the psychology of the human representation in art also comes from the way the figure is standing or the way the body is installed in a certain position, and not only from the face, as is the case in the more traditional psychological portraiture. This doesn’t, however, mean I don’t look for expression. Although Sitting Nude is related to a generic idea of the human body, it also refers to something specific; in this case, myself. The melancholy of the image is more related to an assumed and manifested ethic for beauty.

Xavier Veilhan