Jean Meisel in Klee’s Room

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Once informally known as the Klee Room for the Paul Klee paintings that hung there in years past, a second-floor alcove in the Phillips house is now home to Washington artist Jean Meisel’s Intersections project, titled 50–65 Horizon Line. Meisel, who well recalls the space’s Klee period, has been visiting The Phillips Collection since the 1950s. The jewel-like alcove offers the perfect setting for more than 50 of the painter’s intimate, small-scale works, ranging from 1 1/2 inches to 6 inches. The landscape paintings are hung side by side so that their shared horizon line wraps around the room. The artist has produced hundreds of these serene watercolors since the 1970s.

Vivian Djen, Marketing Communications Editor

Jean Meisel’s Imaginary Seascapes

Meisel install 1_AW

Installation of Jean Meisel: 50-65 Horizon Line, an Intersections contemporary art project. Photo: Amy Wike

Meisel individual blue_RN

Jean Meisel, Untitled watercolor, 1970s-2013. Photo: Rhiannon Newman

Installation of Washington-based artist Jean Meisel’s 50–65 Horizon Line is nearly complete in an intimate gallery on the second floor of the house. Meisel began creating these tiny paintings, none measuring more than six inches, during the 1970s and hasn’t stopped since. While the works might evoke memories of landscapes and seascapes encountered by viewers, these endearing scenes are in fact all created from the artist’s imagination.

Meisel will discuss her work in an Artist’s Perspective at 6:30 pm on Thursday, January 30.