A Ghostly Presence

Exhibition at The Phillips Collection, Washington DC.

Photo: Lee Stalsworth

This pairing in a small gallery on the second floor of the original Phillips house is no coincidence; Intersections artist Arlene Shechet quite intentionally paired her ceramic work with Francis Bacon’s haunting Study of Figure in a Landscape (1952) from the museum’s permanent collection. “My piece is called The Possibility of Ghosts, and when I first saw the Bacon, I felt the ghostly presence of the gray figure, so that came together immediately,” said Shechet. The two pieces are the only works in the gallery, inviting focused and direct dialogue between them. Hear more from Shechet in this interview with the artist.

The Influence of Forrest Bess

Intersections artist Arlene Shechet discusses her work Seeing Asteroids and For the Forest (in response to Forrest Bess‘s The Asteroids #1-4) as well as her work Once Removed. All works discussed on view in the artist’s Intersections installation for the Phillips, From Here On Now.

ArtGrams: Framing Portraits

As part of Arlene Shechet’s Intersections installation, a salon-style display of portraits from the museum’s permanent collection was pulled together. In addition to complementing Shechet’s ceramic works, it turns out this wall is quite photogenic in its own right. Today we highlight a few of our favorite creative shots found in our Instagram feed for this month’s ArtGrams. Share your photos in and around the museum for a chance to be featured on the blog.

#RichardDiebenkorn

A photo posted by Kim C. (@kimacc) on

Mes amies sont belles Pt. I

A photo posted by Daniela (@danielamart__) on

ArtGrams is a monthly series in which we feature our favorite Instagrammed pictures taken around or inspired by the museum. Each month, we’ll feature a different theme based on trends we’ve seen in visitor photos. Hashtag your images with #PhillipsCollection or tag your location for a chance to be featured.