15 Most Viewed Artworks of 2017

We took a look at which of our permanent collection artwork web pages were visited most often during 2017; here are the top 15 pieces!

15. Jean-Baptiste Simeon Chardin’s A Bowl of Plums (c. 1728)

Jean-Baptiste Simeon Chardin, A Bowl of Plums, ca. 1728. Oil on canvas, 17 1/2 x 22 1/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1920

14. Gifford Beal’s On the Hudson at Newburgh (1918)

Gifford Beal, On the Hudson at Newburgh, 1918. Oil on canvas, 36 x 58 1/2 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1924

13. Jacob Lawrence’s Panel no. 1: During World War I there was a great migration north by southern African Americans. (1940–41)

Jacob Lawrence, Panel no. 1: During World War I there was a great migration north by southern African Americans., 1940–41, Casein tempera on hardboard, 12 x 18 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1942

12. Pierre Bonnard’s The Open Window (1921)

Pierre Bonnard, The Open Window, 1921. Oil on canvas, 46 1/2 x 37 3/4 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC. Acquired 1930 © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

11. Honoré Daumier’s The Uprising (between 1848 and 1879)

Honoré Daumier, The Uprising, between 1848 and 1879. Oil on canvas, 34 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1925

Honoré Daumier, The Uprising, between 1848 and 1879. Oil on canvas, 34 1/2 x 44 1/2 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1925

10. Edouard Manet’s Spanish Ballet (1862)

Edouard Manet, Spanish Ballet, 1862. Oil on canvas, 24 x 35 5/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1928

9. Edward Hopper’s Approaching a City (1946)

Edward Hopper, Approaching a City, 1946. Oil on canvas, 27 1/8 x 36 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1947

8. Raoul Dufy’s The Opera, Paris (early 1930s)

Raoul Dufy, The Opera, Paris, early 1930s. Gouache on paper, 19 3/4 x 25 1/4 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1939 © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris

7. Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène Delacroix’s Paganini (1831)

Ferdinand-Victor-Eugène Delacroix, Paganini, 1831. Oil on cardboard on wood panel, 17 5/8 x 11 7/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1922

6. Vincent van Gogh’s Entrance to the Public Gardens in Arles (1888)

Vincent van Gogh, Entrance to the Public Gardens in Arles, 1888. Oil on canvas, 28 1/2 x 35 3/4 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1930

5. Wassily Kandinsky’s Succession (1935)

Wassily Kandinsky, Succession, 1935. Oil on canvas, 31 7/8 x 39 3/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, Dc, Acquired 1944 © 2015 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

4. Paul Cézanne’s The Garden at Les Lauves (Le Jardin des Lauves) (ca. 1906)

Paul Cézanne, The Garden at Les Lauves (Le Jardin des Lauves), ca. 1906. Oil on canvas, 25 3/4 x 31 7/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1955

3. Vincent van Gogh’s The Road Menders (1889)

Vincent van Gogh, The Road Menders, 1889. Oil on canvas, 29 x 36 1/2 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1949.

Vincent van Gogh, The Road Menders, 1889. Oil on canvas, 29 x 36 1/2 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1949

2. Pablo Picasso’s The Blue Room (1901)

Pablo Picasso, The Blue Room, 1901. Oil on canvas, 19 7/8 x 24 1/4 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1927 © 2015 Estate of Pablo Picasso / Aritsts Rights Society (ARS), New York

1. Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party (between 1880 and 1881)

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Luncheon of the Boating Party, between 1880 and 1881. Oil on canvas, 51 1/4 x 69 1/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1923

Ephrussi’s Invaluable Support

Each week for the duration of the exhibition, we’ll focus on one work of art from Renoir and Friends: Luncheon of the Boating Party, on view October 7, 2017-January 7, 2018.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Albert Cahen d’Anvers, 1881

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Albert Cahen d’Anvers, 1881, Oil on canvas; 31 1/2 × 25 1⁄8 in. The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles

Of all the people depicted in Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party, perhaps the most vital to the artist’s emerging reputation at the time was Charles Ephrussi. As a critic, collector, and advocate, Ephrussi offered Renoir valuable support and introduced him to a number of prominent members of society who commissioned him to paint their portraits. Together with the elegant Marguerite Charpentier, Ephrussi influenced the placement of Renoir’s portrait of her with her children (Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) in the Salon of 1879, helping to shift Renoir’s career toward critical and commercial success. In advance of the show, Ephrussi had expressed interest in seeing the recent portrait, and Renoir gladly took him to the Charpentiers’ house for a viewing. Ephrussi, who had purchased work by Renoir for his collection, emerged as a vocal advocate for Impressionism in 1880 when he praised Caillebotte’s paintings in the fifth Impressionism exhibition, and, in a review of the sixth, deplored the absence of Manet, Monet, Sisley, and Renoir. Ephrussi used his influence to get Renoir an advantageous hanging at the Salon—that Marguerite Charpentier was a prominent member of Parisian society did not hurt the placement of her portrait either, nor its critical reception.

Charles Ephrussi introduced Renoir to the Cahen d’Anvers, a prominent Jewish family who proceeded to commission portraits from him. In addition to this image of Albert Cahen d’Anvers, Renoir painted Albert’s three nieces, the daughters of his brother Louis, and his wife, Louise. Ephrussi handled for Renoir the submission of these portraits to the Salon of 1881.

The Dreamer

Each week for the duration of the exhibition, we’ll focus on one work of art from Renoir and Friends: Luncheon of the Boating Party, on view October 7, 2017-January 7, 2018.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, The Dreamer, 1879

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, The Dreamer (La Rêveuse), 1879. Oil on canvas 20 1⁄8 × 24 3⁄8 in. Saint Louis Art Museum, Museum purchase

The model for this painting is thought to be Alphonsine Fournaise, whom Renoir often saw at the Maison Fournaise in Chatou in the late 1870s. She posed for him regularly during the years leading up to Luncheon of the Boating Party. Although there is no direct evidence that Alphonsine modeled for the young woman leaning on the railing of the balcony in the grand composition, she may have occasionally joined the clientele at the Fournaise in such a way.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, On the Shore of the Seine, c. 1879

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, On the Shore of the Seine (Paysage bords de Seine), c. 1879. Oil on linen; 5 1/2 × 9 1⁄8 in. The Baltimore Museum of Art, Saidie A. May Bequest, Courtesy of the Fireman’s Fund Insurance Company

Installed just to the left of this lovely portrait is a smaller, almost sketch-like painting. This quickly executed oil study was probably a gift from Renoir to Alphonsine Fournaise to thank her for modeling for him. In 1864 she married Louis Joseph Papillon, and we know that a Madame Papillon once owned this piece.