Rhythm and Rhyme: A Poetry Tour, Part 2

Left: The Post-it poem in progress. Right: Richard Diebenkorn, Interior with View of Ocean (detail), 1957. Photos: Rachel Goldberg

Left: The Post-it poem in progress Right: Richard Diebenkorn, Interior with View of Ocean (detail), 1957. Photos: Rachel Goldberg

After we explored Luncheon of the Boating Party through Shel Silverstein’s We’re Out of Paint, So . . . , poetry tour participants looked closely at Richard Diebenkorn’s  Interior with View of the Ocean. Together, we create a group Post-it poem to capture the essence of the painting.

To start off, each person wrote down one word on a Post-it note. Together we grouped and organized the verbs, nouns, and adjectives and then regrouped them according to their mood. We started with a phrase that conveyed a negative mood and then moved to the more positive words.

Then we added lines based on questions I posed to the group. What does this painting taste like? What does this painting sound like? We discovered it tasted like ‘sweet citrusy sea salt’ and sounded like the percussion triangle (ding, ding, ding, ding!). Our final product posed a perfect end to our poetry tour:

An Ocean View

Lifeless scorching geometric cube.
Refreshing citrusy summer sea salt view with
Vivid triangles: DING DING DING DING!
Peaceful, breezy
Simplicity.

Margaret Collerd, Public Programs and In-gallery Interpretation Coordinator

Washington Art Matters

Marjorie Phillips painted Night Baseball in 1951, capturing an all American moment that was also so D.C.–the Washington Senators playing the Yankees at Griffith Stadium, a historic ballpark that stood at Georgia Avenue and W Street, NW, until 1965. This summer, the painting joins a selection of work by some 80 artists to tell the story of art in the district beginning in the 1940s. Washington Art Matters: 1940s-1980s is on view at American University’s Katzen Art Center through August 11. When you visit, you’ll recognize other works from the Phillips–Gene Davis’s Black Flowers (1952) and Augustus Vincent Tack’s Time and Timelessness (The Spirit of Creation) (between 1943 and 1944). The exhibition is accompanied by a free lecture series,  co-sponsored by Art Dealers Association of Greater Washington,  which aims to provide attendees with the skills they need to be art collectors themselves.

Marjorie Phillips, Night Baseball, 1951. Oil on canvas, 24 1/4 x 36 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Gift of the artist, 1951 or 1952

Marjorie Phillips, Night Baseball, 1951. Oil on canvas, 24 1/4 x 36 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Gift of the artist, 1951 or 1952