Lighting the Way

IMG_4562

Jacob Lawrence inspired lanterns created by Step Afrika! summer camp students

In August, Phillips School Programs Educators worked with Step Afrika! summer camp students to create lanterns inspired by Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series. The workshop was one of many throughout the city to create lanterns for the first-ever Lantern Walk. Presented by our partners the 11th Street Bridge Park and Washington Performing Arts, the Lantern Walk is inspired by the story of African American families who built their homes in the historic Barry Farm / Hillsdale neighborhoods by candlelight after returning home from a long day’s work.

IMG_4421

The scene is set! Supplies for making lanterns

IMG_4423

The scene is set! Supplies for making lanterns

IMG_4457

Step Afrika! summer camp students learn about Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series

IMG_4519

Step Afrika! summer camp students and Phillips School Program Educators hard at work

IMG_4557

Making lanterns

IMG_4582

Jacob Lawrence inspired lanterns

IMG_4571

Join us for the Lantern Walk on September 17!

 

The Last View of a Childhood Imagination

Klimt_Birch Forest

Gustav Klimt, Birch Forest, 1903. Oil on canvas, 42 1/4 x 42 1/4 in. Paul G. Allen Family Collection

In the Seeing Nature exhibition, the Phillips invites visitors to contribute new, imagined conservation discoveries at our interpretive station, “Seeing Beyond the Frame.” For the month of March, exhibition-goers responded to Birch Forest, painted by Gustav Klimt in 1903.

Perhaps due to the poetic quality of Klimt’s work—the way shapes seem to shift from observed forms to an abstracted tapestry of patterns—or perhaps inspired by the recent poetry reading with Mark Doty and Aimee Nezhukumatathil, poetry abounds in this month’s responses. See more or share your own ideas with #SeeingNature.

side by side_submissions blog 3

Inspired by the poetry of images in the exhibition, visitors have submitted a wide variety of poetic responses to Klimt’s Birch Forest.

asd

Perfect Purple Mountains

Cole_Ruins in the Campagna di Roma

Thomas Cole, Ruins in the Campagna di Roma, Morning, 1842. Oil on panel, 14 1/2 x 24 in. Paul G. Allen Family Collection

In the Seeing Nature exhibition, the Phillips invites visitors to contribute new, imagined conservation discoveries at the interpretive station “Seeing Beyond the Frame.” For the month of February, visitors responded to Thomas Cole’s pastoral landscape Ruins in the Campagna di Roma, Morning (1842).

In addition to some of the creative conservation discoveries our visitors imagined, our visitors have been sharing other kinds of wonderfully visual and lyrical responses. As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words! See more or share your own ideas with #SeeingNature.

side by side_submissions blog 2

Visitors share their lyrical responses to the “Seeing Beyond the Frame” in-gallery interactive.