Goodbye Illuminated Archives; Welcome Participant

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Installation view of Participant, Vesna Pavlović’s exhibition at G Fine Art Gallery. Photo: Vesela Sretenović

As Illuminated Archive, an Intersections project by Vesna Pavlović is approaching its end (closing Sunday, September 28), a new project by the Serbian-born, Nashville-based artist just opened on Saturday, September 13, at G Fine Art in its new 14th Street location.

In this exhibition, the artist continues to explore the archive of images, this time drawn from the Museum of Yugoslav History in Belgrade, Serbia. This brings into play not only the photographic records of the socialist era under the President Josip Broz Tito, she remembers as Participant, but also her own memories of a time that no longer exists.

Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art, Vesela Sretenović

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Installation view of Participant, Vesna Pavlović’s exhibition at G Fine Art Gallery.

Lady In Red: Alex Katz, Brisk Day

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(left) Alex Katz, Brisk Day, 1990. Woodcut, 36 in x 29 1/8 in. Gift of Fenner Milton, 2013. (middle) Alex Katz, Brisk Day, 1990. Aquatint, 35 3/8 in x 28 1/2 in. Gift of Fenner Milton, 2013 (right) Alex Katz, Brisk Day, 1990. Lithograph, 36 in x 29 in. Gift of Fenner Milton, 2013

These three portraits, recent acquisitions for the museum, are currently the only thing displayed in a small gallery at the Phillips. Take a moment to look at each one. What are the similarities? What are the differences?

It’s not until we look at the labels that we realize what creates the small nuances in color and line between the three works—each one is a different form of print. Artist Alex Katz is known for his arresting simplicity of line and form, bright, flat colors, and a powerful graphic punch that link them to commercial art and popular culture. By generalizing the features of a sitter or a landscape, and removing any expressive or emotional content, Katz focuses instead on formal properties of light, scale and color.

Examining Art and Activism

Anne Monahan will be giving a lecture about Faith Ringgold’s mural Die at The Phillips Collection Center for the Study of Modern Art on Thursday, September 11, at 6:30 pm.

Anne Monahan and Faith Ringgold's Die

(Left) Anne Monahan, 2014-15 Postdoctoral Fellow (Right) Faith Ringgold, Die, oil on canvas, 72 x 144 in. © Faith Ringgold

I first became interested in Faith Ringgold’s strategic marriage of art and activism in the 1960s—then an under-examined aspect of her project—while working on my dissertation. Just a couple of years ago, I was prompted to see her ambitious painting Die of 1967 with fresh eyes when a friend asked if it represented stages in a sequential narrative. That question prompted me to think more deeply about the painting’s formal and conceptual ambiguities and how they operated in the political, racial, and aesthetic discourses of its charged moment. As a result, Die and its reception figure in my book Radical/Chic: Race, Politics, and the Legacy of Social Realism in Art of the 1960s as a key example of the shifting dynamics by which racial politics influenced a politics of style.

—Anne Monahan, 2014-15 Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for the Study of Modern Art / The George Washington University