ArtGrams: McArthur Binion

More art from up close. DNA: Black Painting: 1 by McArthur Binion. #latergram #artfromupclose #procrastigramming

A photo posted by Mike Katz (@mug.of.glop) on

This recent acquisition by McArthur Binion has been catching they eyes of visitors ever since it first went on display last year. In this month’s ArtGrams, we’re featuring some of your creative shots of DNA: Black Painting: 1 (2015). Share your photos in and around the museum for a chance to be featured on the blog.

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A visit to a museum.

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A beautiful collage that happens to be a bunch of Mississippi birth certificates. ❤️ #phillipscollection

A photo posted by Monika (@monika_ellis) on

DNA: Black Painting 1, McArthur Binion, 2015 (Section)

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A photo posted by Walter O'Hara (@misternizz) on

Sunday night at #ThePhillipsCollection

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ArtGrams is a monthly series in which we feature our favorite Instagrammed pictures taken around or inspired by the museum. Each month, we’ll feature a different theme based on trends we’ve seen in visitor photos. Hashtag your images with #PhillipsCollection or tag your location for a chance to be featured.

Whitfield Lovell’s Cage

lovell_cage

Whitfield Lovell, Cage, 2001. Charcoal on wood and found objects. Collection of Julia J. Norrell. Courtesy DC Moore Gallery © Whitfield Lovell and DC Moore Gallery, New York

I know why the caged bird sings . . .
–Maya Angelou, “Caged Bird,” 1983

The first act of liberation is to destroy one’s cage.
–Michael S. Harper, poet, 1977

From the front, the cage attached to the lower body of this drawn woman could be associated with the shape of a dress, perhaps even as an indirect reference to the cage-like construction of garments such as 19th-century crinolines. Yet from the side, the cage extends out and becomes suggestive of a pregnant womb. It is harmoniously married to her frame, yet it simultaneously traps her. The contradiction speaks to the uneven treatment women historically have received, being at once matriarchs in the domestic sphere and victims of subjugation and inequality in the public one.

Whitfield Lovell: The Kin Series and Related Works is on view through Jan. 8, 2017.

Video Tour of Whitfield Lovell

“Immersing oneself in the soulful reveries of Lovell’s art opens a window onto our shared past, and it’s ongoing reverberations in our contemporary world.” More from Exhibition Curator Elsa Smithgall on Whitfield Lovell: The Kin Series and Related Works in this video.