Jean Meisel’s Imaginary Seascapes

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Installation of Jean Meisel: 50-65 Horizon Line, an Intersections contemporary art project. Photo: Amy Wike

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Jean Meisel, Untitled watercolor, 1970s-2013. Photo: Rhiannon Newman

Installation of Washington-based artist Jean Meisel’s 50–65 Horizon Line is nearly complete in an intimate gallery on the second floor of the house. Meisel began creating these tiny paintings, none measuring more than six inches, during the 1970s and hasn’t stopped since. While the works might evoke memories of landscapes and seascapes encountered by viewers, these endearing scenes are in fact all created from the artist’s imagination.

Meisel will discuss her work in an Artist’s Perspective at 6:30 pm on Thursday, January 30.

 

Director’s Desk: Participatory Art and New Acquisitions

Curator at Large Klaus Ottmann engages with Roter Gesang (Red Song) by Franz Erhard Walther. Photo: Dorothy Kosinski

Curator at Large Klaus Ottmann demonstrates the participatory qualities of a Franz Erhard Walther sculpture, Roter Gesang (Red Song), at an Arts Committee meeting this week. Walther (born in Fulda, Germany in 1939) produces minimalist sculptures, often in brilliant primary colors, out of ordinary heavy canvas, that seem like soft versions of minimalist compositions. This will look brilliant near our Rothko Room.  It also harmonizes with another new acquisition, Wolfgang Laib’s wax room, in which the visitor enters to appreciate the beautiful aroma, the rich surface, and the embracing small space. Our acquisitions meeting was a heady affair with the approval of many new works from photographs by Eugène Atget, to a painting by Al Held, a painting by Walter Dahn,  and works by Helen Torr, to mention only a few.