The Pain Passes but the Beauty Remains

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, The Judgement of Paris, circa 1908. Black, red, and white chalk on off-white, medium-weight, medium-texture paper, 19 1/4 x 24 1/2 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1940.

Pierre-Auguste Renoir, The Judgement of Paris, circa 1908. Black, red, and white chalk on off-white, medium-weight, medium-texture paper, 19 1/4 x 24 1/2 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1940.

Having worked at the Phillips for over a year, I couldn’t even begin to list all of the questions I get asked about Pierre-Auguste Renoir. Most visitors are curious about what is quite possibly the most famous painting in our collection, Luncheon of the Boating Party. I personally prefer his smaller chalk study, The Judgement of Paris, that currently hangs in a nearby gallery, because it demonstrates just how talented and determined Renoir was as an artist.

You would never know by looking at the works he produced from 1892 until his death in 1919, but Renoir suffered from debilitating rheumatoid arthritis for those last three decades or so of his life. His hands were deformed, his joints severely damaged, and he was wheelchair-bound for most of his later years. He adapted his painting techniques to cope: his children or other assistants held his palettes, placed paintbrushes in his permanently curled fingers, and even moved his canvases underneath his paintbrush so that he could hold his arm still to reduce the pain.

And yet Renoir continued to produce masterpieces. The Musée d’Orsay‘s famous version of The Bathers was completed just before his death, the Phillips’s chalk drawing is from around 1908, and a small bronze also in our collection is from 1916. It is astonishing to think that these amazing pieces were created by a man who was in constant pain and often essentially paralyzed. Jean Renoir, the artist’s son, wrote that “visitors who were unprepared for this could not take their eyes off his deformity. Though they did not dare to mention it, their reaction would be expressed by some such phrase as ‘It isn’t possible! With hands like that, how can he paint those pictures? There’s some mystery somewhere.'”

The video below was filmed in 1915, just four years before Renoir’s death, and shows the painter and his assistants at work in his studio in Cagnes-sur-Mer. Around this time, a young Matisse asked Renoir why he still painted when it was obvious just how much he suffered. Renoir answered thus: “The pain passes but the beauty remains.”

Katherine Luer, Museum Assistant

[youtube=http://youtu.be/UA4pRAZQY3g&w=600]

Des Visages Familiers

Henri Matisse, Interior with Egyptian Curtain, 1948. Oil on canvas

Henri Matisse, Interior with Egyptian Curtain, 1948. Oil on canvas, 45 3/4 x 35 1/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1950.

When lawyers go on vacation, they likely avoid courthouses. When teachers take a holiday, they don’t tour the local schools. But when museum folks go globe-trotting, well, we just can’t help ourselves. And it was just that inescapable magnetism of an art-filled gallery that caused a serendipitous and delightful run-in, in Paris, between two vacationing Brookes (Brooke Horne of the director’s office and Brooke Rosenblatt of the education department) at the Centre Pompidou last week. Mere footsteps away, another traveling Phillips resident, Matisse’s Interior with Egyptian Curtain (1948), was also there on loan as part of their exhibition, Matisse: Pairs and Sets, which closed on Monday.

The Artist Sees Differently: Kurtis Ceppetelli

Kurtis Ceppetelli, Museum Assistant

Kurtis Ceppetelli. Photo by Claire Norman

How did you learn about the Phillips?

I learned about the Phillips about six years or so ago. I came to see a Milton Avery show. I remember it only being in the original house.

Do you feel you are inspired by the Phillips art?

I am very much inspired by the Phillips art. Since I’ve worked here, my work has changed to a stronger, more contemporary feel. I guess the art surrounding me at the Phillips has influenced me to make paintings that are new and fresh to help continue the evolution of art.

Do you listen to anything as you do your artwork?

I do listen to music, all types depending on the mood I want to create within the piece. Sometimes I watch/listen to movies, or I will turn on a basketball game or some other game. I use this to obtain outside substance that is transferred into the painting in some way. Continue reading “The Artist Sees Differently: Kurtis Ceppetelli” »