Paint What You Sense: Monet in Vétheuil

Monet_landscape on ile-saint-martin

Claude Monet, En Paysage dans I’île Saint-Martin, 1881. Oil on canvas, 28 13/16 x 23 5/8 in. Paul G. Allen Family Collection

Bright and warm, Claude Monet’s En Paysage dans I’île Saint-Martin (on view in Seeing Nature: Landscape Masterworks from the Paul G. Allen Collection) depicts a nearly perfect day. Monet painted this scene in Vétheuil, a small village forty miles west of Paris, where he lived with his wife and two children, as well as the family of his patron, Ernest Hoschedé. In settling in Vétheuil, Monet hoped to find not only creative inspiration, but also imagery that could be translated into salable pictures that would replenish his dwindling financial resources. Filling the canvas with loosely applied dashes of brightly hued paint, Monet captured light and atmosphere—a goal shared by his fellow French Impressionists. One of the original members of that group of avant-garde painters, Monet painted what he sensed, not just what he saw.

Dispatches: Courier’s Perks from Paris

Louis Vitton Foundation 1_Vesela Sretenovic

Fondation Louis Vuitton

Courier trips come in a package of “pain & pleasure.” The former includes long hours of waiting in cold cargo areas with no coffee machines, at times delayed flights, riding in trucks, waiting for customs clearance, and frequent jet lag…but at the end of the tunnel, there are the pleasures of seeing new places and a lot of art! On a recent courier trip, we had the chance to visit the new Parisian museum Fondation Louis Vuitton, designed by architect Frank Gehry and opened to the public in October 2014 on the outskirts of Paris’s Bois De Boulogne. It is an amazing sailboat-like edifice made of glass and concrete that makes you feel small yet comfortable, showcasing contemporary art. In addition to the current exhibition of art from China, there are a few art commissions, including Ellsworth Kelly’s paintings for the auditorium, as well as Olafur Eliasson’s mesmerizing installation with sound. These courier’s perks make you alive and ready to jump on a plane again!

Vesela Sretenovic, Senior Curator of Modern and Contemporary Art 

Louis Vitton Foundation 2_Vesela Sretenovic

Fondation Louis Vuitton

Olafur Eliasson side by side_Vesela Sretenovic

Olafur Eliasson’s “Inside the horizon” (2014) installation

Louis Vitton Foundation 3_Vesela Sretenovic

Fondation Louis Vuitton

Ellsworth Kelly auditorium side by side_Vesela Sretenovic

Works by Ellsworth Kelly commissioned for the auditorium

Women’s History Month: Hear Her Roar

Mitchell_August Rue Duguerre

Joan Mitchell, August, Rue Daguerre, 1957. Oil on canvas, 82 x 69 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, DC, Acquired 1958; © Estate of Joan Mitchell

March may be coming to an end, but we are surely not ready to finish celebrating Women’s History Month just yet. Women artists have helped to propel contemporary art into the rich field it is today, so I thought it only right to dedicate this post to one of the female artists I find most fascinating from the Phillips’s permanent collection—Joan Mitchell (1925-1992).

Joan Mitchell, born in Chicago, was an essential member of the American Abstract Expressionist movement and an all around fierce character. Sitting pretty in the galleries is Joan Mitchell’s August, Rue Daguerre (1957), an energetic oil on canvas painting, which was inspired by a bustling Paris street. This work, with its rather violent brush strokes and rich colors, is representative of Joan’s work as she was inspired by lively friends (fellow artists de Kooning and Kline) and the cities she traveled between most, New York City and Paris. Having lived in a number of locations, Joan’s abstract paintings expressed her environment and her reaction to them.

I adore how in looking at this painting, one can begin to visualize what Joan was seeing both in her surroundings and how they affected her own psyche. The various shades of brown and black on the canvas could be illustrative of the statuesque Parisian architecture, but also might signify how Joan feels content and rooted in Paris. Perhaps the interspersed strokes of bright, yet subdued reds and blues express the unpredictable French citizens Joan passes daily along the winding streets. I think the magic of this emotive work and of abstract art as a whole is that it’s always up for interpretation.

August, Rue Daguerre (1957) is certainly one of my favorite paintings in the Phillips’s collection. I appreciate how Joan Mitchell was brave enough to express herself through abstract art, knowing critics and the public may never fully understand her vision… and personally, I think being brave is what being a woman is all about.

Aysia Woods, Marketing Intern