Let’s Dance: More Phillips Pop Culture Moments

See other Phillips Pop Culture Moments

How could it be that we’ve never noticed this before? Museum Assistant and blog super-tipster, Ianthe Gergel, sent me a link to David Bowie’s Let’s Dance video, telling me to pause it at the 2 minute, 40 second mark, and of course, clear as a bell, there is our Paul Klee Printed Sheet with Picture (1937). And she also identified the painting on the right as Picasso’s The Three Dancers (1925).

Jean Meisel in Klee’s Room

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Once informally known as the Klee Room for the Paul Klee paintings that hung there in years past, a second-floor alcove in the Phillips house is now home to Washington artist Jean Meisel’s Intersections project, titled 50–65 Horizon Line. Meisel, who well recalls the space’s Klee period, has been visiting The Phillips Collection since the 1950s. The jewel-like alcove offers the perfect setting for more than 50 of the painter’s intimate, small-scale works, ranging from 1 1/2 inches to 6 inches. The landscape paintings are hung side by side so that their shared horizon line wraps around the room. The artist has produced hundreds of these serene watercolors since the 1970s.

Vivian Djen, Marketing Communications Editor

Paul Klee, Born 134 Years Ago Today

Paul Klee builds himself a little house of art in a realm somewhere between childhood’s innocence and everyman’s prospect of infinity… [He] believes that art is nothing if it is not personal expression–that love must come back to its vacant dwelling. –Duncan Phillips, 1942
Paul Klee, Efflorescence, 1937

Paul Klee, Efflorescence, 1937, Oil on cardboard, incised 13 1/8 x 10 1/2 in.; 33.3375 x 26.67 cm.. Acquired 1938. The Phillips Collection, Washington DC.