People Who Work Here: Lisa Leinberger

To celebrate National Volunteer Week, Rolf Rykken sat down with Lisa Leinberger, our tireless volunteer coordinator, to talk about the Phillips volunteer program, recently listed among D.C.’s top 25 volunteer opportunities in the Washington Post.

Photograph of volunteer coordinator Lisa Leinberger at the Art Information Desk

Volunteer Coordinator Lisa Leinberger at the Art Information Desk. Photo: Joshua Navarro

Lisa Leinberger,  Volunteer Coordinator

When did the Art Information Desk start?

When the volunteer program originally started [in 1988].

Has the service changed over the years?

Yes, there are quite a few more volunteers now than in the past. There are 90–100 volunteers now. The program was more or less in place when I took over in February 2006. The volunteer program is under visitor services. The demographic of volunteers has changed. There are more young professionals who volunteer (about 15-20%), several mid-career folks (about 10-15%), as well as retirees now.

And there are three types of volunteers at the Phillips: departmental volunteers, volunteer children’s docents, and art information volunteers.

What are the qualifications to serve at the Art Information Desk?

Enthusiasm for the museum is the first qualification.

A volunteer must commit to a minimum of one year service, two shifts each month, and attend two formal training sessions per year.

I give each volunteer a private tutorial about the collection, its history and philosophy (“the eye” of Duncan Phillips), plus they are briefed on each special exhibition.

How did you learn about the information desk?

I knew the importance of volunteer programs from my former position as board member and chairman at the New Mexico Museum of Art, Fine Art Committee, in Santa Fe, NM.

Two days after I moved back to D.C. in 2005, I became a member of The Phillips Collection.

My house was under construction at the time. The noise and the dust were punishing. I knew this museum was filled with quiet beauty. It was the perfect escape. I called the museum to inquire about volunteering. That very day the volunteer coordinator was moving to another position. After a long conversation about my interests and qualifications, she asked me if I would be interested in applying for the position that she was vacating. Long story short, I now have what  many folks call “the best job in D.C.”

Many first-time visitors seem very enthusiastic–especially after seeing the collection. Is that your impression too?

First-time visitors, frequent visitors, and even members are constantly telling volunteers at the Art Information desk how wonderfully welcoming this museum is. Folks often stop to chat with volunteers to share a story about a former visit or to marvel at a new exhibition or addition to the collection.

Do you have a favorite artist in the collection?

Each time the galleries change I get a new point of view and appreciation for various art works in the collection. However, I am continually besotted with Paul Klee.

The Artist Sees Differently: Roberto Alcaraz

Roberto Alcaraz, Museum Assistant and Sunday Concerts Assistant

Roberto Alcaraz on a break with his guitar. Photo: Joshua Navarro

How did you learn about the Phillips?

A cousin of mine, who was living here at the time, first mentioned it to me soon after my arrival in D.C. However, it did not take long for me to realize its importance in the cultural life of the city.

Do you feel you are inspired by the Phillips art?

Yes. There is a wealth of great works that are really inspiring. Any collection that includes works by van Gogh, Klee, Morandi, Rothko, plus all the major impressionists, is bound to have works worth looking up to.

What do you listen to when you work on your photography?

Curiously, having a music background, I prefer not listening to music when I am in a darkroom doing prints. I try to focus on my task in hand with no distractions, if possible. Continue reading “The Artist Sees Differently: Roberto Alcaraz” »

Congenial Spirits: Klee and Noland

(left) Paul Klee, Young Moe, 1938. Colored paste on newspaper on burlap, 20 7/8 x 27 5/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1948. (right) Kenneth Noland, In the Garden, 1952. Oil on hardboard, 19 1/2 x 30 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1952.

I was dumbstruck when I first saw Paul Klee’s painting Young Moe (1938) up in the Klee Room. How had I never before recognized the apparent influence of this Klee in Kenneth Noland’s In the Garden (1952)?

As a Museum Assistant, I spend a lot of time looking at the art in various galleries, and Young Moe and In the Garden have both been consistently on display during my time at the Phillips. It seems the echos of Klee in Noland’s work are far from accidental–as a young artist in Washington, D.C., Noland spent a lot of time at The Phillips Collection and in the original Klee Room itself.

To make way for the upcoming Joseph Marioni installation, the Noland piece is currently taking a break from the museum walls. You can still find Young Moe in the Klee Room through the end of the year.

Have you noticed resonances between other works at the Phillips? Please post your observations as a comment here.

Piper Grosswendt, Museum Assistant/Marketing Intern