American Acrostics: Richard Diebenkorn

Richard Diebenkorn, Interior with View of the Ocean, 1957

Richard Diebenkorn, Interior with View of the Ocean, 1957, Oil on canvas 49 1/2 x 57 7/8 in.; 125.73 x 147.0025 cm. Acquired 1958. The Phillips Collection, Washington DC.

To celebrate the last month of Made in the USA, we’ve asked Phillips staff to create acrostic poems for works in the exhibition. We’ll feature some of our favorite submissions over the next few weeks. In this post, Sarah Osborne Bender, Technical Services Librarian and Collections Metadata Specialist, clearly has her mind on being seaside.

Richard Diebenkorn, Interior with a View of the Ocean

Until the sun came out
Sitting in chairs
Across from each other in a cloudy room

Sarah Osborne Bender, Technical Services Librarian and Collections Metadata Specialist

#SpinePoetry for National Poetry Month: Part I

In celebration of National Poetry Month, we asked Phillips staff to venture to The Phillips Collection Library and (literally) compile books into stacks—turning the titles into cohesive poems. Marketing and Communications Intern Joelle Levinas kicked us off with this series of spine poems relating to the museum.

joelle-levinas_art in our time

Photo: Joelle Levinas

 

Art In Our Time
The Expanded Eye
Invisible Colors
Parallel Visions
Fast Forward
Art of Our Time

 

 

 

 

 

joelle-levinas_what is art

Photo: Joelle Levinas

 

What Is Art?
Places of Delight
Color and Meaning
Forms of Passion
Making Choices
Feeding Desire
Making Paradise
Fixing the World

 

 

 

 

joelle-levinas_collections

Photo: Joelle Levinas

 

Museum Collection(s)
Landscape with Figure
Modernism
Action/Abstraction
Portraits
Color and Culture
Impressionism
The Phillips Collection

 

 

 

 

Check back for more poems this month! Compile your own and share them on Twitter and Instagram with #spinepoetry.

Postman Poetry

Vincent van Gogh, Portrait of Joseph Roulin, 1889. Oil on canvas, 25 3/8 x 21 3/4 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. William A. M. Burden, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rosenberg, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. Armand P. Bartos, The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, Mr. and Mrs. Werner E. Josten, and Loula D. Lasker Bequest (all by exchange). Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art /Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY

Vincent van Gogh, Portrait of Joseph Roulin, 1889. Oil on canvas, 25 3/8 x 21 3/4 in. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. William A. M. Burden, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Rosenberg, Nelson A. Rockefeller, Mr. and Mrs. Armand P. Bartos, The Sidney and Harriet Janis Collection, Mr. and Mrs. Werner E. Josten, and Loula D. Lasker Bequest (all by exchange). Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art /Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY

 

One of van Gogh’s closest friends when he lived in Arles was Joseph Roulin, who worked for the local post office. Van Gogh executed six paintings and three drawings of Roulin between 1888 and 1889. The artist thought so highly of Roulin that he confessed in a letter to his brother Theo, “I don’t know if I will be able to paint the Postman as I feel him.”

How would you choose to represent one of your closest friends or family member? How would you emphasize how they make you feel and what they mean to you?

We’ve been asking visitors to use haiku, a Japanese 17 syllable poem.

Title: Person’s name
Line 1: 5 syllables describing how you know him or her
Line 2: 7 syllables describing what he or she looks like
Line 3: 5 syllables describing how you feel about him or her

Graduate Intern Beth Rizley Evans wrote one about her sister to help inspire you.

Cassandra
Sister, doctor, friend
We look like repetitions
She laughs at my jokes

Proud of your work? Share your haiku on Twitter and tag it #vangoghhaiku.