Sculpture on the Move

UMD Appel installation 1_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland. All photos: Sarah Corley

You might notice that the large, colorful sculpture from the corner of 21st and Q Streets, NW, is gone. This work, The Elephant by Karel Appel, has found a new home at the University of Maryland! Here are some behind-the-scenes photos of the move and installation; check back for a video.

UMD Appel installation 2_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland.

UMD Appel installation 3_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland.

UMD Appel installation 4_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland.

UMD Appel installation 5_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland.

UMD Appel installation 6_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland.

UMD Appel installation 7_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland.

UMD Appel installation 8_Sarah Corley

Installing Karel Appel’s The Elephant at the University of Maryland.

 

ArtGrams: Framing the Elephant

nicoleeboni

Photo: Instagram/nicoleeboni

We’re sad to see Karel Appel: A Gesture of Color go, but Appel’s The Elephant remains on our corner for a bit longer! In this month’s ArtGrams, we’re sharing your creative shots of this sculpture. Share your photos in and around the museum for a chance to be featured on the blog.

francoisehazel

Photo: Instagram/francoisehazel

kac906

Photo: Instagram/kac906

esoteric_soiree

Photo: Instagram/esoteric_soiree

caseycats

Photo: Instagram/caseycats

jenniferway

Photo: Instagram/jenniferway

rejanefe

Photo: Instagram/rejanefe

efstewart

Photo: Instagram/efstewart

quicoycoco

Photo: Instagram/quicoycoco

ArtGrams is a monthly series in which we feature our favorite Instagrammed pictures taken around or inspired by the museum. Each month, we’ll feature a different theme based on trends we’ve seen in visitor photos. Hashtag your images with #PhillipsCollection or tag your location for a chance to be featured.

Artist as Poet: Forgotten Angels

On July 21, 2016, Deputy Director for Curatorial and Academic Affairs Klaus Ottmann shares an overview of Karel Appel: A Gesture of Color. In anticipation, we’re sharing examples of Appel’s poetry paired with his artwork on the blog. 

Appel_Nude Figure

Karel Appel, Nude Figure, 1989. Oil on canvas, 76 x 95 5/8 in. Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris © Karel Appel Foundation, c/o ARS New York, 2016

We feel nothing
only the light growing
we feel that life
has forgotten her wings

The world has gone
from sleepy space
to a technological penitentiary
with the sound-tape of human rights
babbling on through the night

one smile, one angel smile
might burn the shadows on the roof
and let us see the stars
like flowers.

Karel Appel, “The Forgotten Angels”

 

 

 

 

 

Appel_Tree

Karel Appel, Tree, 1949. Gouache on wood, 38 5/8 x 29 1/2 x 24 3/8 in. Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris © Karel Appel Foundation, c/o ARS New York, 2016

A tree is poetic
because physicality
is in itself poetic,
because it is a presence,
because it is full of mystery,
because it is full of ambiguity,
because even a tree is a sign
of a chromatic system,
Who speaks by way of the tree?
Reality itself.

Karel Appel (trans. Sam Garrett)