Putting the Process on the Wall: Ellsworth Kelly Maquette

 A small installation of works on paper by Ellsworth Kelly was recently installed in conjunction with Ellsworth Kelly: Panel Paintings 2004-2009, currently on view through September 22Included in these works is a small maquette by Kelly, done in preparation for a 2004 sculpture commissioned by the Phillips, shown below.

Installation view of Ellsworth Kelly's Maquette for EK 927, 2005. Photo: Joshua Navarro

Installation view of Ellsworth Kelly’s Maquette for EK 927, 2005. Mixed media, 9 x 11 x 5/8 in. (22.9 x 27.9 x 1.6 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., Acquired 2006. Photo: Joshua Navarro

To commemorate the new courtyard opening in 2006, The Phillips Collection commissioned Kelly to create a sculpture specifically conceived for the museum’s new courtyard as a gift of Phillips Trustee Margaret Stuart Hunter. Mounted at an unusual angle, Untitled (EK 927) (pictured below) is a large-scale bronze curve, perched elegantly on the west wall of the Hunter Courtyard. It reflects Kelly’s enduring interest in uncovering the reductive essentials in natural forms. There is a timeless and mysterious quality to the sculpture—a simple form of line, volume, and shadow that seems to defy gravity.

Ellsworth Kelly, Untitled, 2005. Bronze. 17 in x 63 3/16 in x 1 in; 297.22572 cm x 160.46704 cm x 2.54 cm. Commissioned in honor of Alice and Pamela Creighton, beloved daughters of Margaret Stuart Hunter, 2006. Photo: Lee Stalsworth

Ellsworth Kelly, Untitled (EK 927), 2005. Bronze. 17 in x 63 3/16 in x 1 in (297.2 x 160.5 x 2.5 cm). Commissioned in honor of Alice and Pamela Creighton, beloved daughters of Margaret Stuart Hunter, 2006. Photo: Lee Stalsworth

The sculpture and its corresponding maquette were both accessioned into the collection in 2006. You may be asking why the Phillips decided to acquire the model Kelly made for the sculpture and accession it into the collection as a work of art in itself.  Maquettes, by nature, are simply stand-ins for the real thing, and are frequently discarded once the installation of art is complete. When they are created by an artist, however, maquettes reveal much about the artistic process involved in creating a larger-scale work. This particular maquette was presented in 2006 to then-director Jay Gates and Ms. Hunter by Kelly himself, who was at the museum overseeing the installation of the sculpture, as a gift in honor of the collaboration. Accessioning the maquette into the collection was a conscious decision by staff to highlight Kelly’s creative process and the personal relationship between Kelly and the Phillips. As we honor Kelly during the year of his 90th birthday, we wanted to emphasize our history with the prolific artist and shed light on the process behind one of our most important works by featuring the maquette alongside the fully-realized works currently on display.

On a side note, this isn’t the only time a maquette for a sculpture has been accessioned into the museum’s collection. In 2012, a model for Seymour Lipton’s Oracle (1966), a bronze and Monel sculpture at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, was accessioned into our permanent collection. Lipton is well represented at the Phillips with sculpture and drawings, but this model was an important acquisition to the curatorial team as it reveals the artistic intent behind a finished product, as well as draws interesting comparisons to other works by the artist in our collection.

Seymour Lipton, Model for "Oracle" 1965. Nickel, silver, and bronze on Monel height: 15 inches (base: 4 1/4 x 3 3/4 x 2 7/8 x 3 1/2 in.) Gift of Alan Lipton, 2012.

Seymour Lipton, Model for “Oracle” 1965. Nickel, silver, and bronze on Monel height: 15 inches (base: 4 1/4 x 3 3/4 x 2 7/8 x 3 1/2 in.) Gift of Alan Lipton, 2012.

Memories in Pollock

Upon entering the current special exhibition Angels, Demons, and Savages: Pollock, Ossorio, Dubuffet and looking left, I am startled by this monumental enamel and oil on canvas by Jackson Pollock. Though two-dimensional, its form emerges as a formidable human head, imposing as any ancient bust. A more contemporary relationship comes to mind–a memory flickers each time I pass it by of Per Kirkeby’s Large Head (1984), which sat just around the corner in last season’s exhibition.

Cecilia Wichmann, Publicity and Marketing Manager

Jackson Pollock, Number 7, 1952, 1952. Enamel and oil on canvas, 53 1/8 x 40 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Emilio Azcarraga Gift, in honor of William S. Lieberman, 1987 © 2012 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Jackson Pollock, Number 7, 1952, 1952. Enamel and oil on canvas, 53 1/8 x 40 in. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Purchase, Emilio Azcarraga Gift, in honor of William S. Lieberman, 1987 © 2012 The Pollock-Krasner Foundation / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Climbing through De Chirico

Panoramic installation view of Giorgio De Chirico installation

Installation view of Myth and Archaeology in the Work of Giorgio De Chirico. Photo: Amy Wike

The Phillips’s elliptical stairway is freshly installed with sculpture and drawing for Myth and Archaeology in the Work of Giorgio De Chirico, on view through June 15 and in celebration of the 2013 Year of Italian Culture in the United States. These early works demonstrate how the artist used figures from mythology, archaeological artifacts, and historical events to create images that suggest an alternate, mysterious reality.

Phillips employees unpack and place the works featured in the exhibition.

Phillips employees unpack and place the works featured in the exhibition. Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

Sculpture by De Chirico, as viewed from above and below in the Phillips's stairwell.

Sculpture by De Chirico, as viewed from above and below in the Phillips’s stairwell. Photos: Amy Wike

Gold sculpture by Giorgio De Chirico

Installation view of Myth and Archaeology in the Work of Giorgio De Chirico. Photo: Amy Wike