Climbing through De Chirico

Panoramic installation view of Giorgio De Chirico installation

Installation view of Myth and Archaeology in the Work of Giorgio De Chirico. Photo: Amy Wike

The Phillips’s elliptical stairway is freshly installed with sculpture and drawing for Myth and Archaeology in the Work of Giorgio De Chirico, on view through June 15 and in celebration of the 2013 Year of Italian Culture in the United States. These early works demonstrate how the artist used figures from mythology, archaeological artifacts, and historical events to create images that suggest an alternate, mysterious reality.

Phillips employees unpack and place the works featured in the exhibition.

Phillips employees unpack and place the works featured in the exhibition. Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

Sculpture by De Chirico, as viewed from above and below in the Phillips's stairwell.

Sculpture by De Chirico, as viewed from above and below in the Phillips’s stairwell. Photos: Amy Wike

Gold sculpture by Giorgio De Chirico

Installation view of Myth and Archaeology in the Work of Giorgio De Chirico. Photo: Amy Wike

A Fond Farewell to Xavier Veilhan’s Red Bear

Sunny skies and relatively warm temperatures Friday helped make for a smooth de-installation of Xavier Veilhan’s The Bear sculpture from the plinth at 21st and Q. The Bear will now begin a long journey back to it’s permanent home in the Northwest. During his time here, the Bear cheerfully welcomed visitors to the Phillips – we are a little sad to say goodbye.

Getting ready to go: Protecting the Bear with soft cloth.

Protecting the Bear with layers of soft cotton cloth.

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Almost ready to go.

Preparing to lift the Bear from its base.

Preparing to lift the Bear from its base.

Continue reading “A Fond Farewell to Xavier Veilhan’s Red Bear” »

From Another Angle

Xavier Veilhan, Jean-Marc, 2012. Acier inoxydable, peinture polyurethane / Stainless steel, polyurethane paint; 400 x 141 x 108 cm / 157 ½ x 55 ½ x 42 ½ in. Courtesy Andréhn-Schiptjenko, Stockholm. Photo ©Stephen Smith; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2012 & ARS, New York, 2012 .

Xavier Veilhan, Jean-Marc, 2012. Acier inoxydable, peinture polyurethane / Stainless steel, polyurethane paint; 400 x 141 x 108 cm / 157 ½ x 55 ½ x 42 ½ in. Courtesy Andréhn-Schiptjenko, Stockholm. Photo ©Stephen Smith; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2012 & ARS, New York, 2012 .

Earlier this month, Xavier Veilhan installed Jean-Marc, his first permanent public sculpture in the U.S., a stone’s throw away from MoMA on the corner of 53rd Street and Sixth Ave. in New York City. Photos of the installation are up on the artist’s website. On a trip to attend the opening of Wolfgang Laib’s Pollen from Hazelnut at MoMA, Phillips Director Dorothy Kosinski passed the giant blue sculpture and immediately noted “there seems to be a nice artistic symmetry between 53rd Street NYC and Q & 21st in D.C.” The sharp edges and larger-than-life quality of the sculpture do indeed bear a striking resemblance to Veilhan’s The Bear outside the Phillips.

(Left) Xavier Veilhan, The Bear, 2010. Painted polyurethane resin, 106 ¼ x 69 ¼ x 53 3/8 in. Private collection, USA. Courtesy Galerie Perrotin, Hong Kong and Paris. Installation view, 2012, The Phillips Collection Photo © Lee Stalsworth © 2012 Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, and ARS, New York. (Right) Xavier Veilhan, Jean-Marc, 2012. Acier inoxydable, peinture polyurethane / Stainless steel, polyurethane paint; 400 x 141 x 108 cm / 157 ½ x 55 ½ x 42 ½ in. Courtesy Andréhn-Schiptjenko, Stockholm. Photo © Stephen Smith; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2012

(Left) Xavier Veilhan, The Bear, 2010. Painted polyurethane resin, 106 ¼ x 69 ¼ x 53 3/8 in. Private collection, USA. Courtesy Galerie Perrotin, Hong Kong and Paris. Installation view, 2012, The Phillips Collection Photo © Lee Stalsworth © 2012 Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, and ARS, New York. (Right) Xavier Veilhan, Jean-Marc, 2012. Acier inoxydable, peinture polyurethane / Stainless steel, polyurethane paint; 400 x 141 x 108 cm / 157 ½ x 55 ½ x 42 ½ in. Courtesy Andréhn-Schiptjenko, Stockholm. Photo © Stephen Smith; © Veilhan / ADAGP, Paris, 2012