Spring Bloom in Every Filter

Instagram floral photos

Clockwise from top left: Instagram submissions from @sutterwulghe, @ingsegg, @ginnymjohnson, @huipopotamus, @lizchu4, and @spanuska

Spring has sprung at the Phillips! Visitors are noticing the lovely tulip magnolias outside of the museum’s front door and can’t resist the photo opportunity. Here’s a handful of our favorites from Instagram; keep these beautiful shots coming!

Instagram floral photos

Clockwise from top left: Instagram submissions from @therandomduck, @rachjpay, @viklsue, @emmadubb, @rivabelle, and @phillipscollection

 

Our Favorite Blossoms Are Back!

Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

What kind of tree is that? It’s a Magnolia soulangiana, also known as a Saucer Magnolia.

The tree is not native to the United States, but is a cross between two Chinese magnolias. Magnolia soulangiana was hybridized in 1820 in a French garden. The tree was named after the owner of the garden, Etienne Soulange-Bodin. He had been a cavalry officer in Napoleon’s army and afterward dedicated his time to his garden. Considering the just popularity of this beautiful tree in both Europe and the States, one would say his work was a success.

Ianthe Gergel, Museum Assistant