Only in Paris—Veilhan at Beaugrenelle

I’m jealous. One of my family members sent me a photograph of a newly opened local shopping mall and I was amazed to see installed in the central atrium a mobile by Xavier Veilhan. You may remember Veilhan’s The Bear and his exhibition at the Phillips last fall. In fact, I had originally experienced the same sculpture when it was on view at the Grand Palais’s exhibition, Dynamo. Tell me, is it only in Paris that you can go from updating your wardrobe to seeing amazing art in the same place?

Xavier Veilhan's mobile installed at Beaugrenelle, Paris. Photo: Emmanuele Bondeville Barbin.

Xavier Veilhan’s mobile installed at Beaugrenelle, Paris. Photo: Emmanuele Barbin-Bondeville.

Director’s Desk: Saying Goodbye to Art We Love

Xavier Veilhan's The Bear arrives and departs

The Bear arrived in warm weather and left in the cold. Photos: Amy Wike (left) and Dorothy Kosinski (right)

Bye, bye bear! I am touched by the attachment our public developed for Xavier Veilhan’s red bear. It reminds me of the vehement reactions to the departure of Linn Meyer’s wall drawing, another work that was only here temporarily. Our visitors’ emotional engagement is proof of the power of art.

Dorothy Kosinski, Director

2010 Intersections installation, at the time being by Linn Meyers

2010 Intersections installation, at the time being by Linn Meyers. Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

A Fond Farewell to Xavier Veilhan’s Red Bear

Sunny skies and relatively warm temperatures Friday helped make for a smooth de-installation of Xavier Veilhan’s The Bear sculpture from the plinth at 21st and Q. The Bear will now begin a long journey back to it’s permanent home in the Northwest. During his time here, the Bear cheerfully welcomed visitors to the Phillips – we are a little sad to say goodbye.

Getting ready to go: Protecting the Bear with soft cloth.

Protecting the Bear with layers of soft cotton cloth.

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Almost ready to go.

Preparing to lift the Bear from its base.

Preparing to lift the Bear from its base.

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