Amelia the Thinker #MyAmericanArt

Ever wonder what the person is a painting is thinking about? We do ALL THE TIME, especially Miss Amelia Van Buren, the subject of Thomas Eakins’s painting on view in Made in the USA: American Masters from The Phillips Collection, 1850–1970.

We’ve been inviting visitors to consider, “What is Amelia thinking?” We shared some initial submissions a few weeks ago and we’re so excited by the responses we wanted to publish more highlights.

What do you think Amelia is thinking about? Share your ideas on what Amelia is thinking via Instagram or Twitter using #MyAmericanArt. Or if you’re nearby, come see the painting and submit your response at our in-gallery comment station. 

4 up collage

What is Amelia Thinking?

Since Made in the USA: American Masters from The Phillips Collection, 1850–1970 opened, visitors have shared their ideas about what Miss Amelia Van Buren, the subject of Thomas Eakins’s painting, may be thinking.

We’ve gotten 75 submissions so far via a comment station in the galleries and social media.

What do you think Amelia is thinking? Instagram a photo or Tweet your ideas using #MyAmericanArt.

Below are some highlights from the first week of the exhibition. We love the creativity!

Visitor submissions from our talkback station in the galleries.

Visitor submissions from our talkback station in the galleries.

 

Dissolving Objects

Wassily Kandinsky, "Painting with White Border (Moscow)," 1913, 55 1/4 x 78 7/8 in. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Founding Collection, By gift 37.245. © 2011 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / ADAGP, Paris.

Because Kandinsky’s Painting with White Border deserves more than one visit to appreciate it, this past week I returned not once, but twice to hear Spotlight Tours on the painting by Brooke Rosenblatt and Karen Schneider. While both talks were captivating in themselves, what interested me most were the reactions from museum visitors, which I feel embodied Kandinsky’s intention perfectly.

As I listened to the responses of the groups, I couldn’t help but feel a sense of déjà vu as the separate tours reacted almost identically. Continue reading “Dissolving Objects” »