5 Things Helen Frederick’s Acts of Silence Can Teach You About Museum-Going

Museums can sometimes be considered intimidating spaces, complete with a flurry of visitors, pristine paintings, and immaculate sculptures. But venture into the galleries and there’s much to be gained. Today we look at Helen Frederick’s Acts of Silence as an example of how each and every exhibition has something to offer museum-goers; it’s just a matter of knowing what to look for.

Changing Museum Rituals: Part 3

After trying my own hand at interacting with Franz Erhard Walther’s Red Song, I stood in the gallery and admired the true beauty of this piece that at first glance I hadn’t understood. Soon, two visitors, Janet and Cate, entered the gallery. After reading the Red Song text and checking which piece it was referring to, they put the provided plastic covers over their shoes and carefully walked over. As they began this process, I noticed how their body language changed.

Changing Museum Rituals: Part 2

Upon first glance, Franz Erhard Walther’s Red Song can be perceived as three red cloth lockers lined up next to one another with three red coats hanging inside. The artist asks the viewer to carefully untie the item hanging in the box and interact with it (visitors to the Phillips are invited to activate this piece between 2–3 pm daily).