Postcard from Mallorca: Inside the Home and Studio of Bernardi Roig

Greetings from Binissalem, Mallorca!

2014 Intersections artist Bernardi Roig and Senior Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art Vesela Sretenovic in the artist's studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

2014 Intersections artist Bernardi Roig and Senior Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art Vesela Sretenovic in the artist’s studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

A few weeks ago, I visited Bernardi Roig’s studio (a former wine cellar) and home, both from the 16th century. This was in preparation for his elaborate Intersections project scheduled for the fall of 2014, when we’ll have his works dispersed throughout the Phillips and outside the building. I took some photos of the artist in his studio and of his beautiful home for your viewing pleasure and to give you a sneak peek as to what you can expect from his 2014 exhibition. The artist promised to send homemade wine form Mallorca for his opening, so watch for the event in November 2014!

Saludos and hasta pronto!

Vesela Sretenovic, Senior Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art

Bernardi Roig's studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

Bernardi Roig’s studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

Roig creates a drawing using a hand-made implement to steady his hand during the elaborate sketching.

Roig creates a drawing using a homemade implement to steady his hand. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

The foyer of Roig's home, with one of the artist's sculptures displayed on the right. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

The foyer of Roig’s home, with one of the artist’s sculptures displayed on the right. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

 

The Rain Moves On

Panels that make up Sandra Cinto's One Day, After the Rain, being deinstalled, August 19, 2013. Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

Panels that make up Sandra Cinto’s One Day, After the Rain, being de-installed, August 19, 2013. Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

It is with a heavy heart that we watch the de-installation of Sandra Cinto’s Intersections work, One Day, After the Rain. The multi-panel canvas painting, chiefly created on site, was unveiled to our visitors with the arrival of another beloved presence at the museum, our Tryst café. The café will continue to provide a place for conversation, rest, and refreshment. Cinto’s work will move on.

Take a #breakforart with the Phillips

The Phillips Collection is constantly changing. You never know what will be on view from one day to the next.

Imagine my surprise when I entered into the newly-opened exhibition History in the Making: 100 Years after the Armory Show. There, hanging ever-so-gracefully, is Maurice Prendergast’s On the Beach (ca. 1907-1909). I’ve never seen this work of art in person before, having only worked at the Phillips for one year. And — as if by magic — we just featured Prendergast’s effervescent watercolor in one of the education department’s pilot Twitter chats, #breakforart.

Maurice Prendergast, On the Beach, ca. 1907-1909. Watercolor and pencil on paper, 14 1/2 x 21 1/2 in. (36.83 x 54.61 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C., Acquired 1926.

Maurice Prendergast, On the Beach, ca. 1907-1909. Watercolor and pencil on paper, 14 1/2 x 21 1/2 in. (36.83 x 54.61 cm). The Phillips Collection, Washington D.C., Acquired 1926.

These Twitter chats are meant for you, our public. When the museum is closed, the works of art still live. We’re opening up the museum, virtually of course, on Mondays for you to comment, question, provoke, laugh, and be inspired. Be a part of our Twitter chat experiments by joining us each Monday through September 30 from 12-1pm EST. Follow the Phillips on Twitter as we #breakforart!

And in the meantime, you can catch up with the rich conversation on that Prendergast painting, here.

New to Twitter? Want to join our chat? Just search @PhillipsMuseum or the hashtag #breakforart each Monday at 12 EST to join. 

 

Meagan Estep, Teacher Programs Coordinator