Postcard from Mallorca: Inside the Home and Studio of Bernardi Roig

Greetings from Binissalem, Mallorca!

2014 Intersections artist Bernardi Roig and Senior Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art Vesela Sretenovic in the artist's studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

2014 Intersections artist Bernardi Roig and Senior Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art Vesela Sretenovic in the artist’s studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

A few weeks ago, I visited Bernardi Roig’s studio (a former wine cellar) and home, both from the 16th century. This was in preparation for his elaborate Intersections project scheduled for the fall of 2014, when we’ll have his works dispersed throughout the Phillips and outside the building. I took some photos of the artist in his studio and of his beautiful home for your viewing pleasure and to give you a sneak peek as to what you can expect from his 2014 exhibition. The artist promised to send homemade wine form Mallorca for his opening, so watch for the event in November 2014!

Saludos and hasta pronto!

Vesela Sretenovic, Senior Curator for Modern and Contemporary Art

Bernardi Roig's studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

Bernardi Roig’s studio. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

Roig creates a drawing using a hand-made implement to steady his hand during the elaborate sketching.

Roig creates a drawing using a homemade implement to steady his hand. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

The foyer of Roig's home, with one of the artist's sculptures displayed on the right. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

The foyer of Roig’s home, with one of the artist’s sculptures displayed on the right. Photo: Vesela Sretenovic

 

The Rain Moves On

Panels that make up Sandra Cinto's One Day, After the Rain, being deinstalled, August 19, 2013. Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

Panels that make up Sandra Cinto’s One Day, After the Rain, being de-installed, August 19, 2013. Photos: Sarah Osborne Bender

It is with a heavy heart that we watch the de-installation of Sandra Cinto’s Intersections work, One Day, After the Rain. The multi-panel canvas painting, chiefly created on site, was unveiled to our visitors with the arrival of another beloved presence at the museum, our Tryst café. The café will continue to provide a place for conversation, rest, and refreshment. Cinto’s work will move on.

Intersecting El Greco

El Greco, The Repentant St. Peter, between 1600 and 1614. Oil on canvas, 36 7/8 x 29 5/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1922

El Greco, The Repentant St. Peter, between 1600 and 1614. Oil on canvas,
36 7/8 x 29 5/8 in. The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Acquired 1922

Baltimore-based artist Bernard Hildebrandt gives El Greco’s The Repentant St. Peter (1600-1614) a face lift (literally) in the new Intersections project at The Phillips Collection. Two things about this project are interesting to me: the sound that echoes across the room and the placement of the art work. The sound to me is like a low growl emanating from St. Peter’s mouth, an agonized groan. It is mesmerizing. Moreover, the work is shown in low lighting, giving the room an eerie atmosphere. The project sits right in the middle of the permanent collection. Just around the corner is the cheerful Luncheon of the Boating Party (1880-81) by Renoir.

El Greco was recalling the traditions of Byzantium icon paintings with his up-close view of the holy man’s face, but in the then-contemporary Baroque style depicting high drama and emotion. Hildebrandt brings El Greco’s work into the 21st century by converting a series of images into a new medium–video.

We will have a chance to hear more from Hildebrandt about the process behind his work in an Artist’s Perspective talk this Saturday, July 20, at 3 pm. I wonder what El Greco would have thought of the intersection?

Jane Clifford, Marketing Intern

Bernhard Hildebrandt, Peter, 2013 © 2013 Courtesy of the artist

Bernhard Hildebrandt, Peter, 2013 © 2013 Courtesy of the artist