A Subtle But Significant Improvement: Conserving A “Petal Painting” (Part III)

Read parts one and two of this series.

Results of Treatment

Treatment resulted in a subtle but significant improvement to the picture’s appearance. Greater contrast between the dark colors in the background and the pastel “petals” in the foreground returns a sense of vibrancy and movement to the composition. In addition, although they remain inherently fragile, consolidation left the paint layers more stable–improving the overall condition of the picture.

Number 8 seen Before Treatment, left, and After Treatment, right

No. 8 seen Before Treatment, left, and After Treatment, right

Left: The back of the painting, exposed; note the lighter color of the new stretcher keys against the darker, aged wood of the stretcher Right: The back of the painting with a protective foam-core backing.

Left: The back of the painting showing the canvas and stretcher. Right: The back of the painting with a protective foam-core backing, attached to the stretcher to add support and protect the back of the canvas from dust and blows.

2 thoughts on “A Subtle But Significant Improvement: Conserving A “Petal Painting” (Part III)

    • Thanks very much for your comment. I should clarify that we used foam board with an inert foam interior and an acid-free, buffered paper exterior. We do use corrugated polycarbonate on occasion as well, for all the reasons you mention.

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